Thursday, August 6, 2015

Jordan Pestok - Blog Challenge 3


Jordan Pestok - Blog Challenge #3

I chose the profession of a high school chemistry teacher. I chose to be a teacher because it is what I have always wanted to do. For as long as I can remember I wanted to be a teacher. I have changed my mind a couple of times but then I always found a huge flaw in whatever profession I had made up my mind to be other than a teacher, but I always came back to teaching. It always felt like the right thing to do to me. I always felt like I would have the most impact on the world. Instead of becoming a doctor, I could teach a future doctor how interesting chemistry is and give them the inspiration to become a doctor. I could teach countless doctors, lawyers, scientists; I could teach anyone. I could affect countless lives just by being a teacher. In the end the hard part is deciding what subject it is I would teach, but this blog challenge made that decision really easy, so I will be a chemistry teacher. After participating in Project SEED I would probably choose to teach chemistry (or something science related anyway) after I saw all the different applications chemistry has.


The University of Pittsburgh has a school of education that has a master’s degree in science education, while this is not exactly a chemistry teacher education it is a science education degree and will work just fine. To get accepted you would need to have a 3.0 GPA, a written statement of career goals and degree objectives, and have three letters of recommendation. The types of classes you would take are Psychological Perspectives on Education, Research Methods, and Social and Cultural Perspectives on Education. There is a list of specific classes you can choose from but there are too many to put on here. I hope everyone gets the idea. You need 3 credits in each of the area and 21 credits in Major Field Studies. Once you have taken all of your classes and are ready to become a teacher you need to pass a comprehensive exam at the end.


New York University Steinhardt is a school I have never heard of until this morning when I finished up the research. They have a two year long master’s program to become a chemistry teacher. Their program is a little more specific in chemistry instead of just a general science teacher education. They also have a one year long program after a master’s degree is obtained. It is called the Clinically Rich Integrated Science Program (CRISP). It helps teachers or soon to be teachers get into classrooms and learn a little more about how to be a teacher. It is similar to student teaching. Some of the core classes you would take in the master’s program are General Chemistry I & Laboratory 5, General Chemistry II & Laboratory 5, Organic Chemistry I & Laboratory 5, Organic Chemistry II & Laboratory 5, Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics & Spectroscopy, 4 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics 4, Physical Chemistry Laboratory 4, and General Physics I & II 10.


The last school I chose to look at is Stanford University’s School of Education. It is a one year full time intensive program. The classes you would take are in the chart below. In order to get accepted into the program you have to write an essay that includes your education background, experience with youth, and interest in teaching. You also need three letters of recommendation and need to pass two tests before you are even in the school. They are the GRE, which you do no have to take if you went to Stanford for your bachelor’s degree, and the California Basic Skills Requirement Test; everybody has to take that one.

Strands/Courses
Summer
Pre-fall
Fall
Winter
Spring
Curriculum
&
Instruction
EDUC262A:
English C&I
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC262B:
English C&I
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC262C:
English C&I
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC263A:
Mathematics C&I
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC263B:
Mathematics C&I
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC263C:
Mathematics C&I
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC264A:
World Languages C&I
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC264B:
World Languages C&I
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC264C:
World Languages C&I
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC267A:
Science C&I
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC267B:
Science C&I
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC267C:
Science C&I
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC268A:
History-Social Science C&I
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC268B:
History-Social Science C&I
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC268C:
History-Social Science C&I
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
Social
&
Psychological Foundations
EDUC289:
The Centrality of LIteracies in Teaching and Learning
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC240:
Adolescent Development and Learning
(5 units)
2014 syllabus
Language
&
Literacy
EDUC299:
Equity and Schooling
(2 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC388A:
Language Policies and Practices
(2 units)
2015 syllabus (link is external)
Pedagogical
Strategies
EDUC244: Classroom Management
(2 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC285:
Supporting Students with Special Needs
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC284:
Teaching and Learning in Heterogeneous Classrooms
(3 units)
2014 syllabus
Practicum
&
Student Teaching
EDUC246A:
Secondary Teaching Seminar
(3 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC246B:
Secondary Teaching Seminar
(5 units)
2014 syllabus
EDUC246C:
Secondary Teaching Seminar
(5 units)
2015 syllabus
EDUC246D:
Secondary Teaching Seminar
(3-7 units)
2015 syllabus
10 units
18 units
10 units
10 units

 

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